Google Fiber Coming to 100 Austin Institutions for Free

Fiber Optics

Fiber Optics

Attached please find the PDF doc for the Google Fiber free rollout.  100 nonprofits and organizations are included.  If they are in your neighborhood, then you are likely in. Please scroll through all pages to see all 100 recipients.

Google Fiber Austin PDF Organizations and Institutions

By: Matt Foster, ArteWorks SEO

Fake Online Reviews Cost 19 SEO Companies and Their Clients Dearly – 5 Tips to Doing Reputation Management Correctly

Yesterday the New York State Attorney General’s Office announced that 19 SEO firms and their online reputation management clients had agreed to pay in excess of $350,000.00 in fines for false advertising and deceptive trade practices by posting fake online reviews on sites such as Yelp, Google Local and CitySearch. The posting of a fake online review was determined to be a form of false and deceptive advertising known as “astroturfing”.

The undercover sting operation, known as “Operation Clean Turf”, revealed that the fake reviews were obtained by paying individuals in Bangladesh, Eastern Europe and the Philippines from between $1 and $10 per fake review.  It was determined that the reviews would be relied on by consumers in making purchasing decisions and thus constituted false advertising and deceptive trade practices.

1. Don’t Post Fake Reviews

While this may seem blatantly obvious in light of Operation Clean Turf, it still must be stated. Any form of online marketing which is deceptive, fraudulent or misleading should be avoided.

2. Engage Disgruntled Customers

In the event that you do have an unhappy customer, attempt to engage that customer directly and offer to make things right.  Offering a refund, or a discount on a future purchase, or an exchange can go a long way towards smoothing things over and getting a customer to change his or her opinion of your business.

3. Approach Site Owners Directly

In the event that negative press appears on a website such as a discussion forum, it never hurts to simply ask the site owner or administrator to have the negative thread removed.  Oftentimes, simply pointing out to the site owner the harm being caused by the post, as well as your efforts to rectify the situation with the unsatisfied customer can result in the removal of the negative information.

4. Encourage Satisfied Customers to Post Reviews

Encourage all of your customers to post reviews of your business.  While nobody can satisfy every customer, presumably you are still in business because you have mostly satisfied customers.  Encourage these customers to review your business online.  Caveat: do not offer customers incentives for posting favorable reviews or provide suggested language.  If you are doing your job as a business owner, the favorable reviews will come.

5. Hire Only Reputable SEO and Reputation Management Firms

Do your research and due diligence before hiring any SEO firm or reputation management agency.  Find out how long they have been in business, ask if they outsource their work offshores, and don’t be afraid to ask hard questions about the specifics of the strategy that they plan to employ on your behalf.  Remember that you get what you pay for, and if it seems fishy or dishonest, move on to the next agency.

What do you think about the posting of fake online reviews?  Do you have any additional suggestions for business owners seeking to enhance their online reputation?

The official press release from the New York State Attorney General’s Office, including a list of the 19 SEO firms and clients involved, can be found at http://www.ag.ny.gov/press-release/ag-schneiderman-announces-agreement-19-companies-stop-writing-fake-online-reviews-and

By: Matt Foster

Could Google Fiber push Austin, TX past Silicon Valley in terms of technology?

Google finally made their highly-anticipated announcement today about their next stop on the Google Fiber tour, and that’s right, you guessed it, it’s Austin, Texas. Google made their official statement just hours ago, revealing that Austin will be the second recipient of their super-fast 1 gigabit Internet and TV service “Google Fiber.” So how fast is this 1-gigabit service? Faster than most of us can probably even imagine, at about 150 times the speed of your average broadband Internet access speeds in this country. Not only will the 1-gigabit Internet service be available, but Google Fiber also offers a 1-terabyte Google drive space, TV service and a DVR that can record up to 8 shows at once!

Not only are the Internet speeds faster than we can begin to imagine, but they’re also offering a free version of 5Mbps download, 1Mbps upload speed with an initial $300 setup fee, for a guaranteed 7 years of service. While the free version’s speed may not get the tech nerds excited, this is a great feature for Austinites who are living without Internet access, or may still be using dial-up.

While Google’s goodwill and fantastic prices may be making headlines, as an established Austin SEO Company we can’t help but wonder what Google Fiber will mean for Austin’s already prosperous technology industry. Kansas City, Google’s first city chosen for Google Fiber has grown an amazing technology industry, thanks in part to Google Fiber. The Wall Street Journal even listed Kansas City as an “Information Hub” in 2010, saying:

“In 2009 the number of tech companies rose by 5% to 2,900, trumping the growth rates of well-known hubs like Silicon Valley, Boston and Austin, Texas.”

Austin already tops most top 5 charts as one of the most innovative cities in the U.S., so will Google Fiber take them to the top? Austin, Texas, also referred to as Silicone Hills, has been hot on Silicone Valley’s heels in the past few years. In 2010, Forbes listed Austin as the one of most innovative cities in the United States with about 2,900 patented inventions, the second most per-capita. Austin can also thank the University of Texas’ School of Engineering, which ranks ninth on the U.S. News World and Report list of best engineering schools and produces over 1,000 undergraduates per year, many of whom stay to work and live in the innovative city. According to the director of the school’s career center, employers actually come to Austin because “they can get quality and quantity.”

Google Fiber is just one more reason for job-seekers, job creators, and the nation’s bright and innovative to move to Austin, Texas. Google Fiber will continue to build on Austin’s momentum and will help make things possible that we haven’t even dreamed up yet!

Author: Allison Schnur is the Senior Project Manager of ArteWorks SEO, a full service search engine optimization firm located in Austin, TX. For more information about SEO, SEM, or social media please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.

“Much Adoodle about Nothing?” What Kind of Backlash Should Google Expect from the Chavez over Jesus Doodle Decision?

Just one day after Google’s decision to honor the birthday of the founder of the National Farm Workers Association, labor leader and civil rights activist Cesar Chavez, nearly half the world seems to have an opinion. While the choice to honor a devout Christian on one of the most significant Christian holidays has been downplayed, up-played and outright villainized, it remains to be seen if Google will suffer long-term consequences from its decision to ignore the Easter holiday and one of the most significant historic figures of all time.

Originally created in 1998, you can see a timeline of Google doodles at google.com/doodles, which began as a simple homage to holidays with cheeky and childish images, but became decidedly worldlier and more educational throughout the years. Google users have come to expect a new doodle on National holidays, as well as the lesser known holidays and significant dates. The Google doodle has also become Google’s way of expressing their sense of creativity and opinions in a fairly uncontroversial way; until now, that is.

Now the question remains, was Google’s choice to ignore Easter simply an attempt to uphold its duty to remain relevant on a global scale? Or were they consciously making a political stance in honoring a left-winged activist just one year after President Obama declared March 31st as Cesar Chavez day? Or, even more realistically, were they just flaunting their power with their now reported 86% search engine market share? Proving that they no longer have to answer to anyone?

Whether you’re a devout Christian or not, most Americans agree that Google had to foresee the backlash coming, and that they could have potentially made a solid stance on their religious and political views (something many large companies have been doing this past year, especially surrounding the gay marriage issue). So the question remains, will the devout Christians be flocking to use Google’s biggest competitor, Bing, who celebrated Easter with their simple and far less controversial Easter egg background? Or will the frustrated users eventually come running back to Google, whose market share is directly reflected in their mastery of search engine optimization functionality?

Google did release a statement to the Washington Post that read, “We enjoy celebrating holidays at Google but, as you may imagine, it’s difficult for us to choose which events to highlight on our site. Sometimes for a given date, we feature an historical event or influential figure that we haven’t in the past.” Fox News was quick to point out that Google has never honored Jesus in the past, on either Easter or Christmas.

In Google’s defense, however, the Chavez family released a statement showing their appreciation for the honor. They stated, “coincidentally, his birthday this year falls on Easter Sunday. We understand the concern that some people have, but for many there is no contradiction. Cesar lived the gospel according to Jesus Christ: he helped the poor and outcast.” Could Google have actually thought they were actually taking the least controversial route? At this point it seems that all we can really do is speculate and watch as the aftermath unfolds.

Author: Allison Schnur is the Senior Project Manager of ArteWorks SEO, a full service search engine optimization firm located in Austin, TX. For more information about SEO, SEM, or social media please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.

USPS Goes Local

Local search isn’t something that can be ignored. In the past people used the phone book or Yellow Pages to find local businesses and services. In this day and age we know that most people turn to their smart phones and Google searches to find what’s near them. If you do business locally and haven’t submitted your address to Google Places you are falling behind in your marketing needs. Whether you have a brick and mortar store or run your business online, you should be using local search in your marketing and SEO strategies.

If you don’t have a physical address because your company is virtual or run solely online, there are ways you can be listed in Google Local. PO boxes are not allowed but companies such as Mailboxes Plus allow you have to mail box with their address and a suite number. The United States Postal Service has caught on to the competition and the importance for businesses to have local mailing addresses for Google’s search results. USPS now offers street addressing.

USPS is now offering a new service for their post office box clients. If you need a local address, you can use the physical address of the post office location and will be given a unique suite number. This makes it possible for businesses who don’t have store fronts to be listed in local searches. Again, just by submitting the address doesn’t guarantee your ranking. You will still need to properly optimize and have an effective SEO strategy to rank at the top of Google Places.

So, why is this important? Google customizes search results for each users based on location and browsing history. Local companies are favored in search results. Local listings appear at the top of a search result because businesses in a different city from the user show no relevance. Google is frequently updating their search queries to favor relevant searches for the user. Even when you don’t include the zip code or city name during a search for a service or business, local search results usually always appear at the top of your results.

Author: Krystle Green is the Vice President of ArteWorks SEO, a full service search engine optimization firm located in Austin, TX. For more information about SEO, SEM, or social media please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.

Get Well Duck and Great Job on Social

My advertising and social media mind has been curious for a few days now about Aflac’s latest television ad campaign. I have to admit, they are doing a great job of getting people to take seeing their TV ad a step further and incorporating social media or client/potential customer involvement.Aflac Duck

Aflac, which is a supplemental insurance agency for individuals and groups, uses a duck as their company mascot/recognizable logo. The Aflac duck has been featured in various commercials and is used in the name of the company logo. Their creative team nailed the marketing slogan and mascot with the phrase, “We’ve got you under our wing.” It’s genius. You may have seen their TV commercial which starts with a doctor giving a press release about the Aflac duck being injured. The premise, to relate this to their offerings of supplemental insurance, is that the duck was in an accident. The doctor goes on to say that Aflac Duck has sustained a laceration to the wing and a fractured beak. The poor little guy will be out of work while in recovery. Luckily, with Aflac’s help they are paying his living expenses.

What the ad does as a way to stay social, is they give a link where you can send the duck a get well card. This gets the TV user away from the commercial and on to the website. Since my curiosity was piqued, I went to the web address, http://www.getwellduck.com, and I was automatically redirected to a Facebook page. I was expecting a website page and not a Facebook fan page. You don’t have to sign up for an app or even like the fan page to send a card. The card creator allows you to choose a background, and image, and you can also include a personal message. This is great social media involvement.

At first I was surprised there wasn’t a website or a landing page from the Aflac website. However, I like that the company isn’t pushing their website traffic on me and they are keeping this social, light, and fun. I think this extra step taken makes the company seem more personal and less corporate. It is important for other businesses to follow their lead. People are more likely to relate to a person, in this case a duck or mascot, than they are a corporate logo.

Author: Krystle Green is the Vice President of ArteWorks SEO, a full service search engine optimization firm located in Austin, TX. For more information about SEO, SEM, or social media please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.

SEO and Issues Relating to Page Load Speed

Speedometer

Is Your Site Speed Adequate?

It seems that web design has come full circle. Not too long ago web pages were designed to be compatible with slow dial up modems and needed to load quickly. A good design therefore kept images and code to a minimum so a user could access the page easily over a modem connection. With the advent of broadband connections page speed became less of a concern and developers were more at liberty to create pages with fancy animations, graphics, transitions and effects, all of which required substantial bandwidth due to the image heavy and code heavy requirements of this type of design. But then came mobile, with bandwidth limitations often similar to that of the dial up connections of yesteryear. Google now includes page load speed as a factor in its search rankings and that has received a lot of attention, with many SEOs saying that most sites do not have to worry about it. However, this ignores usability factors such as bounce rate and rate of page abandonment, and little attention has been given to the negative consequences in search rankings to pages with high rates of abandonment.

Google now factors in page load speed as one of its many considerations in determining the quality of a site to be listed in its search results. Google is not too picky about this, however, as only 5% of pages are claimed to be affected by this consideration. So as long as your site is in the top 95% of pages on the web with regards to page load time, the page speed factor will likely not be of consequence to you. A Google Page Speed tool is available online so that you may see how your page stacks up against all the others. The results are given in a score of from 0 to 100, with any score over 5 (representing 5%) considered acceptable.

The fact that only 5% of web pages are affected by the page speed ranking factor has caused many SEO professionals, while acknowledging the existence of page speed as a factor in rankings, to then advise clients that it is not something with which the client should be concerned. This approach, however, ignores other factors relevant to both users and Google itself, and is demonstrative of a tendency within much of the SEO community to focus on only one or a few factors when advising clients as opposed to considering the big picture.

The problem is twofold. First, a page that loads slowly will discourage users from using the page. A large amount of users leaving the page and returning to the search result is knows as the bounce rate or rate of abandonment (the opposite of this is known as stickiness, when a user “sticks” on a site and clicks through multiple pages). Second, Google considers bounce rates and rates of abandonment in its search rankings.

So let’s take the example of a page that scores a 15 on the page speed tool. An untrained SEO provider might state that this is acceptable. However, what this means is that the page in question, while acceptably exceeding Google’s minimum expectations, is still slower than 85% of the web pages out there. The the page is frustratingly slow, Google’s opinion notwithstanding. Now consider the fact that by some estimates over 50% of all search traffic now comes from mobile devices. What do you do when you are on a mobile device and it takes five, ten or twenty seconds to load a page? Most people return to the search results and try again.

The effect of this is that the site owner is losing a large portion of her potential customers. That is a problem. Focusing on rankings only without respect to usability and conversions is a topic for another article. Suffice it to say, however, that if somewhere around 50% of your users are on mobile and are never making it to your site because of your slow page load speed you have a problem.

So the site owner takes an immediate hit in the bottom line as a result of a high abandonment or bounce rate.

Now this is where the snowball effect comes into play. Google also tracks user behavior after the user leaves the search results and lands on a page. If the user bounces off that page, or quickly abandons it by clicking the “Back” button on the browser, then Google knows that. How would you interpret this if you were Google? If a user finds a search result, goes to a page, and then quickly returns, the most logical interpretation is that the page did not offer information relevant to the user’s search query. So Google considers that as Google is in the business of providing relevant results. The slow-to-load page is given a sort of relevance demerit, and its search rankings suffer.

Also consider the fact that Google looks out for nobody but Google. It has obligations to its shareholders. If Google got a reputation for providing results full of slow to load pages, Google users would defect and find an alternative that provided them with speed. Google can’t allow that to happen. To argue the point that page speed is irrelevant to search, or a minor factor in search, is to argue that user behavior is irrelevant to Google’s business model.

So the snowball effect of a page with a low but otherwise acceptable page load speed is this: a slow page load speed will result in higher bounce and abandonment rates. Higher bounce and abandonment rates are interpreted by Google as both (1) a sign that the page is not relevant to the given search query; and (2) a threat to its business model. Therefore, the slow page suffers in the rankings.

By: Matt Foster. Mr. Foster is an SEO consultant and the CEO of ArteWorks SEO in Austin, Texas. Mr. Foster can be found on Twitter @ArteWorks_SEO or on Linked In at /arteworks.

SEO for Parallax

Unimpressed with Parallax SEO?

Unimpressed with Parallax SEO?

Providing SEO for a site utilizing the parallax scrolling effect may at first seem a bit challenging, given the fact that on its face a parallax site does not offer the opportunity for deep links or individually optimized page content. However, there is no need to be unimpressed – there is a solution! Here’s a hint: treat it like a Flash site.

What is a Parallax Site?

The parallax effect is typically achieved using Javascript or JQuery to create a scrolling or 3D effect when jumping between named anchors on a single web page. You can see some examples of sites created using the parallax effect here: http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/21-examples-of-parallax-scrolling-in-web-design

The navigational scheme is such that when navigating about the site, instead of going from one individual URL to another for each page, one long web page is created, which page contains the entire contents of the site. Named anchors are used to jump or scroll between pages. When the user navigates about the site, instead of a new page loading on the screen, the new page scrolls, slides, or “whooshes” in from above, below, or the side, depending upon where the user is at within the one page site’s content, and to which named anchor the user is navigating.

So a site created using the parallax site is an entire site written as one big, fat, giant web page file, graphics and all. The negative SEO implications of this are obvious, and mainly center around (a) the inability to deep link to individual pages of a site using a unique root-level URL; and (b) the difficulty in optimizing basic on page elements such as title tags for individual page content.

Background

We were contacted by a potential client who owned a children’s entertainment center. Think of something along the lines of laser tag, or a bowling alley, or a pizza arcade, or a go cart track. The client had determined to build the site using the parallax effect, and wanted to rank well in the search engines for a variety of keyphrases pertaining to specific events that might be searched for on Google. For example, the client wanted to rank well for such things as birthday parties, bar mitzvahs, quinceaneras and the like.

Normally this would be accomplished by creating separately optimized pages for each of the specific events (title tags and such), describing the packages available for each event, and deep linking using appropriate anchor text to each of the pages. With the parallax site, this was simply not possible.

The Solution

I began to think of solutions to the problem and I found myself treating the parallax page as akin to a Flash site. There’s not much one can typically do with a Flash site – except one thing. Typically I would advise the owner of a Flash site to create a machine readable HTML version, both for the search engines, but also for purposes of accessibility and for those users who may not have the Flash plugin. This would not be considered duplicate content and would not infringe upon any of Google’s guidelines.

In the case of a parallax site though, there would be a duplicate content problem if we created separate “landing” pages for each of the children’s events, as the landing pages would be duplicative of the event content on the parallax page.

So the solution that I came up with was to organize the site content into two separate types of content: (1) Content important to the user but not likely to be searched for; and (2) Content important to the user and highly likely to be searched for.

Examples of content in the first category, that a user would be unlikely to search for yet which would be important information for the user would be such things as a contact form, maps, photo galleries, catering menu, testimonials, and the like. It is highly unlikely that someone is going to search for “laser tag testimonials”.

Examples of content in the second category, that would be both highly likely to be searched for as well as information useful to the user would be the specific events, like birthdays, bar mitzvahs, and such. People search for things like “laser tag birthdays” or even the more general “Austin birthday parties”.

By defining the schism between the two types of content, we can then begin to organize our SEO strategy and incorporate it into the site build. We decided to use the parallax effect on the home page and on all general information-type pages, such as contact, gallery, menu, testimonials, map, etcetera. We included in the parallax page a section called “Events”.

When the user eventually scrolled his or her way through to the Events page, we presented the user with a list of events typically hosted by the facility. Examples would be those given above, such as birthday parties, team parties, church parties, bar mitzvahs, quinceaneras, and such. Each item on the list was a hard link to an individual URL which contained content specific to that event (keyphrase), including optimized on page elements such as title tags, and customized content appropriate to that event.

The net result is that the user starts off on the parallax site, clicks through to a particular event, and lands on a static, or “hard” page, for that event. When clicking back from the event, onto any of the navigation buttons (Home, Contact, etc.), the user is returned to the parallax page and the scrolling effect can begin anew.

The creation of the “hard” event pages allows for individualized SEO for all necessary on page elements, customized content, and deep linking to the site.

Problem solved!

By: Matt Foster

Matt Foster is the CEO of ArteWorks SEO Austin, an Internet marketing and search engine optimization firm located in beautiful Central Texas. For more information, please visit www.arteworks.biz.

Facebook Graph Search. Staying Social In A New Way

The news feeds were buzzing yesterday with the launch of Facebook’s new search feature, called Graph Search. This is by far one of their biggest launches since going public. It was rumored that there would be a mobile phone of some sorts of a full web based search engine. While Graph Search does not have the capacity or search features as Google, it appears to have a competitive edge to one of the biggest search engines. Could Graph Search be the start to a full web based search engine? Zuckerburg has said that they don’t want to delve into Internet Searches.

Graph Search is still in beta form and it allows users to search through content that has been shared with them. Each user will have tailored results. This is somewhat like Google’s custom search results. Facebook’s new feature is a way for people to find other users with similar interests. As Facebook puts it, “Find more of what you’re looking for through your friends and connections.”

Because the new product launch is in beta form, you have to sign up to use it. There is currently a waiting list to use the new search function. You can preview a video here https://www.facebook.com/about/graphsearch Search terms in the video included such phrases as: friends who like trail running, people at my company who like to ski, photos before 1995. It allows a more custom and personal experience and a way to discover what your friends are interested in, what music the like, where they eat, etc. People will be able to use Facebook in a whole new way and it seems like the largest social network is staying on top of their game.

I am currently on the waiting list to test out the new function and I am very excited about it. I was hoping to be able to test it out and review my search results as well as opinions about the searches. Alas, I will have to write a second blog post once my name comes up on the waiting list.

Author: Krystle Green is the Vice President of ArteWorks SEO, a full service search engine optimization Austin firm located in Texas. For more information about SEO, SEM, or social media please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.

New Year’s Resolution – Lose That (Website) Fat!

It’s a new year and a great time to embark on a quest to lose all that extra fat that we have put on over the years. I’m talking about website fat, of course. All of that bloated code, deprecated HTML tags, tables, javascript, JQuery, Flash, images and such. The new trend in both web design and search is to get lean – less is more! Not only does leaner code (faster loading websites) improve search engine rankings (the importance of speed in search engine rankings is no longer merely a topic of debate, it is accepted fact among knowledgeable SEO providers), but also dramatically improves the user experience (in other words, increases conversions, stickiness, and return visits) for the vast numbers of mobile users. If you aren’t willing to cut the fat from your site to create a speedy and enjoyable experience for mobile users, you could be missing out on over half (yes, upwards of 50% of all web searches are now conducted on mobile devices) of your customers.

(As an aside, at the time of writing in January of 2013 I am well aware that our own company’s website is in dire need of a weight loss regimen in accordance with the recommendations in this article. Fear not, as I am not only willing to prescribe the medicine, but I am willing to take it too! Our new website is currently under construction and is anticipated to be launched next month.)

Known as responsive web design, modern user and search engine trends require that most websites over two years old be reworked so as to upgrade to HTML5 and CSS3. The use of these new tools eliminates fat by dispensing with the need for Javascript, JQuery, Flash, and many images, as well as creating leaner HTML code and reducing HTTP requests to the server.

Throught the use of what is called a “media query”, a website can be adapted (or respond to, hence the term “responsive” web design) to any number of screen resolutions or screen sizes, from the smallest mobile device to the largest flat screen display. Media queries establish the operating system, browser, and viewport size (basically, the screen size), among other items, and then tell the site how to display itself to automatically fit the device it is being viewed on. Media queries can also be utilized to serve different file sizes of the same image, for low resolutions (low file size) images for smaller viewports on handheld devices with low bandwidth to high resolution, larger file sizes for HD or “retina” display devices with large screens and a broadband connection. This ensures that the user will get the most optimum viewer experience regardless of the device utilized to view the site.

HTML5 and CSS3 also eliminate the need for many images (therefore HTTP requests to the server and image file downloads) by enabling the site to display gradients, navigation buttons, backgrounds, rounded corners, text effects such as drop shadows, divider lines and the like through the use of a few lines of code. In other words, there is no need to create and download actual images, the code and stylesheet can now be written so as to tell the machine to draw the image or effect itself! Also, the need for Flash or javascript/JQuery transitions and animations can largely be eliminated via this same technique. This cuts tons of website fat, increases download speed and response time. Forms also are no longer dependent on javascript/JQuery or other scripting, as HTML5 fully supports native form functionality.

Also, through the addition of a few lines of code, all of these new features can be made backward compatible for older browsers that do not support HTML5 or CSS3.

With the increasing use of limited bandwidth mobile devices, the above techniques greatly reduce site load times. This, in turn, improves a site’s performance on the search engines as well. Therefore, I would strongly recommend getting a website checkup today so as to maximize your site’s customer reach and SEO performance. Happy new year, and good luck with your new website diet!

About the Author: Matt Foster is the founder of ArteWorks SEO, a web design and SEO firm based in Austin, Texa. For more information, please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.