SEO for Parallax

Unimpressed with Parallax SEO?

Unimpressed with Parallax SEO?

Providing SEO for a site utilizing the parallax scrolling effect may at first seem a bit challenging, given the fact that on its face a parallax site does not offer the opportunity for deep links or individually optimized page content. However, there is no need to be unimpressed – there is a solution! Here’s a hint: treat it like a Flash site.

What is a Parallax Site?

The parallax effect is typically achieved using Javascript or JQuery to create a scrolling or 3D effect when jumping between named anchors on a single web page. You can see some examples of sites created using the parallax effect here: http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/21-examples-of-parallax-scrolling-in-web-design

The navigational scheme is such that when navigating about the site, instead of going from one individual URL to another for each page, one long web page is created, which page contains the entire contents of the site. Named anchors are used to jump or scroll between pages. When the user navigates about the site, instead of a new page loading on the screen, the new page scrolls, slides, or “whooshes” in from above, below, or the side, depending upon where the user is at within the one page site’s content, and to which named anchor the user is navigating.

So a site created using the parallax site is an entire site written as one big, fat, giant web page file, graphics and all. The negative SEO implications of this are obvious, and mainly center around (a) the inability to deep link to individual pages of a site using a unique root-level URL; and (b) the difficulty in optimizing basic on page elements such as title tags for individual page content.

Background

We were contacted by a potential client who owned a children’s entertainment center. Think of something along the lines of laser tag, or a bowling alley, or a pizza arcade, or a go cart track. The client had determined to build the site using the parallax effect, and wanted to rank well in the search engines for a variety of keyphrases pertaining to specific events that might be searched for on Google. For example, the client wanted to rank well for such things as birthday parties, bar mitzvahs, quinceaneras and the like.

Normally this would be accomplished by creating separately optimized pages for each of the specific events (title tags and such), describing the packages available for each event, and deep linking using appropriate anchor text to each of the pages. With the parallax site, this was simply not possible.

The Solution

I began to think of solutions to the problem and I found myself treating the parallax page as akin to a Flash site. There’s not much one can typically do with a Flash site – except one thing. Typically I would advise the owner of a Flash site to create a machine readable HTML version, both for the search engines, but also for purposes of accessibility and for those users who may not have the Flash plugin. This would not be considered duplicate content and would not infringe upon any of Google’s guidelines.

In the case of a parallax site though, there would be a duplicate content problem if we created separate “landing” pages for each of the children’s events, as the landing pages would be duplicative of the event content on the parallax page.

So the solution that I came up with was to organize the site content into two separate types of content: (1) Content important to the user but not likely to be searched for; and (2) Content important to the user and highly likely to be searched for.

Examples of content in the first category, that a user would be unlikely to search for yet which would be important information for the user would be such things as a contact form, maps, photo galleries, catering menu, testimonials, and the like. It is highly unlikely that someone is going to search for “laser tag testimonials”.

Examples of content in the second category, that would be both highly likely to be searched for as well as information useful to the user would be the specific events, like birthdays, bar mitzvahs, and such. People search for things like “laser tag birthdays” or even the more general “Austin birthday parties”.

By defining the schism between the two types of content, we can then begin to organize our SEO strategy and incorporate it into the site build. We decided to use the parallax effect on the home page and on all general information-type pages, such as contact, gallery, menu, testimonials, map, etcetera. We included in the parallax page a section called “Events”.

When the user eventually scrolled his or her way through to the Events page, we presented the user with a list of events typically hosted by the facility. Examples would be those given above, such as birthday parties, team parties, church parties, bar mitzvahs, quinceaneras, and such. Each item on the list was a hard link to an individual URL which contained content specific to that event (keyphrase), including optimized on page elements such as title tags, and customized content appropriate to that event.

The net result is that the user starts off on the parallax site, clicks through to a particular event, and lands on a static, or “hard” page, for that event. When clicking back from the event, onto any of the navigation buttons (Home, Contact, etc.), the user is returned to the parallax page and the scrolling effect can begin anew.

The creation of the “hard” event pages allows for individualized SEO for all necessary on page elements, customized content, and deep linking to the site.

Problem solved!

By: Matt Foster

Matt Foster is the CEO of ArteWorks SEO Austin, an Internet marketing and search engine optimization firm located in beautiful Central Texas. For more information, please visit www.arteworks.biz.

3 thoughts on “SEO for Parallax

  1. Having just googled “SEO issues with parallax scrolling sites” I came across your article, very helpful indeed and makes a lot of sense when you think about it.

  2. Thanks so much for your post! I was asked by some clients about the parallax effect and SEO and am so happy I came across your post. Though we absolutely love the parallax effect, SEO is a huge concern and we’ve often veered away from using. Just have to rethink the strategy. Kudos!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>