Fake Online Reviews Cost 19 SEO Companies and Their Clients Dearly – 5 Tips to Doing Reputation Management Correctly

Yesterday the New York State Attorney General’s Office announced that 19 SEO firms and their online reputation management clients had agreed to pay in excess of $350,000.00 in fines for false advertising and deceptive trade practices by posting fake online reviews on sites such as Yelp, Google Local and CitySearch. The posting of a fake online review was determined to be a form of false and deceptive advertising known as “astroturfing”.

The undercover sting operation, known as “Operation Clean Turf”, revealed that the fake reviews were obtained by paying individuals in Bangladesh, Eastern Europe and the Philippines from between $1 and $10 per fake review.  It was determined that the reviews would be relied on by consumers in making purchasing decisions and thus constituted false advertising and deceptive trade practices.

1. Don’t Post Fake Reviews

While this may seem blatantly obvious in light of Operation Clean Turf, it still must be stated. Any form of online marketing which is deceptive, fraudulent or misleading should be avoided.

2. Engage Disgruntled Customers

In the event that you do have an unhappy customer, attempt to engage that customer directly and offer to make things right.  Offering a refund, or a discount on a future purchase, or an exchange can go a long way towards smoothing things over and getting a customer to change his or her opinion of your business.

3. Approach Site Owners Directly

In the event that negative press appears on a website such as a discussion forum, it never hurts to simply ask the site owner or administrator to have the negative thread removed.  Oftentimes, simply pointing out to the site owner the harm being caused by the post, as well as your efforts to rectify the situation with the unsatisfied customer can result in the removal of the negative information.

4. Encourage Satisfied Customers to Post Reviews

Encourage all of your customers to post reviews of your business.  While nobody can satisfy every customer, presumably you are still in business because you have mostly satisfied customers.  Encourage these customers to review your business online.  Caveat: do not offer customers incentives for posting favorable reviews or provide suggested language.  If you are doing your job as a business owner, the favorable reviews will come.

5. Hire Only Reputable SEO and Reputation Management Firms

Do your research and due diligence before hiring any SEO firm or reputation management agency.  Find out how long they have been in business, ask if they outsource their work offshores, and don’t be afraid to ask hard questions about the specifics of the strategy that they plan to employ on your behalf.  Remember that you get what you pay for, and if it seems fishy or dishonest, move on to the next agency.

What do you think about the posting of fake online reviews?  Do you have any additional suggestions for business owners seeking to enhance their online reputation?

The official press release from the New York State Attorney General’s Office, including a list of the 19 SEO firms and clients involved, can be found at http://www.ag.ny.gov/press-release/ag-schneiderman-announces-agreement-19-companies-stop-writing-fake-online-reviews-and

By: Matt Foster

“Much Adoodle about Nothing?” What Kind of Backlash Should Google Expect from the Chavez over Jesus Doodle Decision?

Just one day after Google’s decision to honor the birthday of the founder of the National Farm Workers Association, labor leader and civil rights activist Cesar Chavez, nearly half the world seems to have an opinion. While the choice to honor a devout Christian on one of the most significant Christian holidays has been downplayed, up-played and outright villainized, it remains to be seen if Google will suffer long-term consequences from its decision to ignore the Easter holiday and one of the most significant historic figures of all time.

Originally created in 1998, you can see a timeline of Google doodles at google.com/doodles, which began as a simple homage to holidays with cheeky and childish images, but became decidedly worldlier and more educational throughout the years. Google users have come to expect a new doodle on National holidays, as well as the lesser known holidays and significant dates. The Google doodle has also become Google’s way of expressing their sense of creativity and opinions in a fairly uncontroversial way; until now, that is.

Now the question remains, was Google’s choice to ignore Easter simply an attempt to uphold its duty to remain relevant on a global scale? Or were they consciously making a political stance in honoring a left-winged activist just one year after President Obama declared March 31st as Cesar Chavez day? Or, even more realistically, were they just flaunting their power with their now reported 86% search engine market share? Proving that they no longer have to answer to anyone?

Whether you’re a devout Christian or not, most Americans agree that Google had to foresee the backlash coming, and that they could have potentially made a solid stance on their religious and political views (something many large companies have been doing this past year, especially surrounding the gay marriage issue). So the question remains, will the devout Christians be flocking to use Google’s biggest competitor, Bing, who celebrated Easter with their simple and far less controversial Easter egg background? Or will the frustrated users eventually come running back to Google, whose market share is directly reflected in their mastery of search engine optimization functionality?

Google did release a statement to the Washington Post that read, “We enjoy celebrating holidays at Google but, as you may imagine, it’s difficult for us to choose which events to highlight on our site. Sometimes for a given date, we feature an historical event or influential figure that we haven’t in the past.” Fox News was quick to point out that Google has never honored Jesus in the past, on either Easter or Christmas.

In Google’s defense, however, the Chavez family released a statement showing their appreciation for the honor. They stated, “coincidentally, his birthday this year falls on Easter Sunday. We understand the concern that some people have, but for many there is no contradiction. Cesar lived the gospel according to Jesus Christ: he helped the poor and outcast.” Could Google have actually thought they were actually taking the least controversial route? At this point it seems that all we can really do is speculate and watch as the aftermath unfolds.

Author: Allison Schnur is the Senior Project Manager of ArteWorks SEO, a full service search engine optimization firm located in Austin, TX. For more information about SEO, SEM, or social media please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.

Get Well Duck and Great Job on Social

My advertising and social media mind has been curious for a few days now about Aflac’s latest television ad campaign. I have to admit, they are doing a great job of getting people to take seeing their TV ad a step further and incorporating social media or client/potential customer involvement.Aflac Duck

Aflac, which is a supplemental insurance agency for individuals and groups, uses a duck as their company mascot/recognizable logo. The Aflac duck has been featured in various commercials and is used in the name of the company logo. Their creative team nailed the marketing slogan and mascot with the phrase, “We’ve got you under our wing.” It’s genius. You may have seen their TV commercial which starts with a doctor giving a press release about the Aflac duck being injured. The premise, to relate this to their offerings of supplemental insurance, is that the duck was in an accident. The doctor goes on to say that Aflac Duck has sustained a laceration to the wing and a fractured beak. The poor little guy will be out of work while in recovery. Luckily, with Aflac’s help they are paying his living expenses.

What the ad does as a way to stay social, is they give a link where you can send the duck a get well card. This gets the TV user away from the commercial and on to the website. Since my curiosity was piqued, I went to the web address, http://www.getwellduck.com, and I was automatically redirected to a Facebook page. I was expecting a website page and not a Facebook fan page. You don’t have to sign up for an app or even like the fan page to send a card. The card creator allows you to choose a background, and image, and you can also include a personal message. This is great social media involvement.

At first I was surprised there wasn’t a website or a landing page from the Aflac website. However, I like that the company isn’t pushing their website traffic on me and they are keeping this social, light, and fun. I think this extra step taken makes the company seem more personal and less corporate. It is important for other businesses to follow their lead. People are more likely to relate to a person, in this case a duck or mascot, than they are a corporate logo.

Author: Krystle Green is the Vice President of ArteWorks SEO, a full service search engine optimization firm located in Austin, TX. For more information about SEO, SEM, or social media please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.

SEO and Issues Relating to Page Load Speed

Speedometer

Is Your Site Speed Adequate?

It seems that web design has come full circle. Not too long ago web pages were designed to be compatible with slow dial up modems and needed to load quickly. A good design therefore kept images and code to a minimum so a user could access the page easily over a modem connection. With the advent of broadband connections page speed became less of a concern and developers were more at liberty to create pages with fancy animations, graphics, transitions and effects, all of which required substantial bandwidth due to the image heavy and code heavy requirements of this type of design. But then came mobile, with bandwidth limitations often similar to that of the dial up connections of yesteryear. Google now includes page load speed as a factor in its search rankings and that has received a lot of attention, with many SEOs saying that most sites do not have to worry about it. However, this ignores usability factors such as bounce rate and rate of page abandonment, and little attention has been given to the negative consequences in search rankings to pages with high rates of abandonment.

Google now factors in page load speed as one of its many considerations in determining the quality of a site to be listed in its search results. Google is not too picky about this, however, as only 5% of pages are claimed to be affected by this consideration. So as long as your site is in the top 95% of pages on the web with regards to page load time, the page speed factor will likely not be of consequence to you. A Google Page Speed tool is available online so that you may see how your page stacks up against all the others. The results are given in a score of from 0 to 100, with any score over 5 (representing 5%) considered acceptable.

The fact that only 5% of web pages are affected by the page speed ranking factor has caused many SEO professionals, while acknowledging the existence of page speed as a factor in rankings, to then advise clients that it is not something with which the client should be concerned. This approach, however, ignores other factors relevant to both users and Google itself, and is demonstrative of a tendency within much of the SEO community to focus on only one or a few factors when advising clients as opposed to considering the big picture.

The problem is twofold. First, a page that loads slowly will discourage users from using the page. A large amount of users leaving the page and returning to the search result is knows as the bounce rate or rate of abandonment (the opposite of this is known as stickiness, when a user “sticks” on a site and clicks through multiple pages). Second, Google considers bounce rates and rates of abandonment in its search rankings.

So let’s take the example of a page that scores a 15 on the page speed tool. An untrained SEO provider might state that this is acceptable. However, what this means is that the page in question, while acceptably exceeding Google’s minimum expectations, is still slower than 85% of the web pages out there. The the page is frustratingly slow, Google’s opinion notwithstanding. Now consider the fact that by some estimates over 50% of all search traffic now comes from mobile devices. What do you do when you are on a mobile device and it takes five, ten or twenty seconds to load a page? Most people return to the search results and try again.

The effect of this is that the site owner is losing a large portion of her potential customers. That is a problem. Focusing on rankings only without respect to usability and conversions is a topic for another article. Suffice it to say, however, that if somewhere around 50% of your users are on mobile and are never making it to your site because of your slow page load speed you have a problem.

So the site owner takes an immediate hit in the bottom line as a result of a high abandonment or bounce rate.

Now this is where the snowball effect comes into play. Google also tracks user behavior after the user leaves the search results and lands on a page. If the user bounces off that page, or quickly abandons it by clicking the “Back” button on the browser, then Google knows that. How would you interpret this if you were Google? If a user finds a search result, goes to a page, and then quickly returns, the most logical interpretation is that the page did not offer information relevant to the user’s search query. So Google considers that as Google is in the business of providing relevant results. The slow-to-load page is given a sort of relevance demerit, and its search rankings suffer.

Also consider the fact that Google looks out for nobody but Google. It has obligations to its shareholders. If Google got a reputation for providing results full of slow to load pages, Google users would defect and find an alternative that provided them with speed. Google can’t allow that to happen. To argue the point that page speed is irrelevant to search, or a minor factor in search, is to argue that user behavior is irrelevant to Google’s business model.

So the snowball effect of a page with a low but otherwise acceptable page load speed is this: a slow page load speed will result in higher bounce and abandonment rates. Higher bounce and abandonment rates are interpreted by Google as both (1) a sign that the page is not relevant to the given search query; and (2) a threat to its business model. Therefore, the slow page suffers in the rankings.

By: Matt Foster. Mr. Foster is an SEO consultant and the CEO of ArteWorks SEO in Austin, Texas. Mr. Foster can be found on Twitter @ArteWorks_SEO or on Linked In at /arteworks.

SEO for Parallax

Unimpressed with Parallax SEO?

Unimpressed with Parallax SEO?

Providing SEO for a site utilizing the parallax scrolling effect may at first seem a bit challenging, given the fact that on its face a parallax site does not offer the opportunity for deep links or individually optimized page content. However, there is no need to be unimpressed – there is a solution! Here’s a hint: treat it like a Flash site.

What is a Parallax Site?

The parallax effect is typically achieved using Javascript or JQuery to create a scrolling or 3D effect when jumping between named anchors on a single web page. You can see some examples of sites created using the parallax effect here: http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/21-examples-of-parallax-scrolling-in-web-design

The navigational scheme is such that when navigating about the site, instead of going from one individual URL to another for each page, one long web page is created, which page contains the entire contents of the site. Named anchors are used to jump or scroll between pages. When the user navigates about the site, instead of a new page loading on the screen, the new page scrolls, slides, or “whooshes” in from above, below, or the side, depending upon where the user is at within the one page site’s content, and to which named anchor the user is navigating.

So a site created using the parallax site is an entire site written as one big, fat, giant web page file, graphics and all. The negative SEO implications of this are obvious, and mainly center around (a) the inability to deep link to individual pages of a site using a unique root-level URL; and (b) the difficulty in optimizing basic on page elements such as title tags for individual page content.

Background

We were contacted by a potential client who owned a children’s entertainment center. Think of something along the lines of laser tag, or a bowling alley, or a pizza arcade, or a go cart track. The client had determined to build the site using the parallax effect, and wanted to rank well in the search engines for a variety of keyphrases pertaining to specific events that might be searched for on Google. For example, the client wanted to rank well for such things as birthday parties, bar mitzvahs, quinceaneras and the like.

Normally this would be accomplished by creating separately optimized pages for each of the specific events (title tags and such), describing the packages available for each event, and deep linking using appropriate anchor text to each of the pages. With the parallax site, this was simply not possible.

The Solution

I began to think of solutions to the problem and I found myself treating the parallax page as akin to a Flash site. There’s not much one can typically do with a Flash site – except one thing. Typically I would advise the owner of a Flash site to create a machine readable HTML version, both for the search engines, but also for purposes of accessibility and for those users who may not have the Flash plugin. This would not be considered duplicate content and would not infringe upon any of Google’s guidelines.

In the case of a parallax site though, there would be a duplicate content problem if we created separate “landing” pages for each of the children’s events, as the landing pages would be duplicative of the event content on the parallax page.

So the solution that I came up with was to organize the site content into two separate types of content: (1) Content important to the user but not likely to be searched for; and (2) Content important to the user and highly likely to be searched for.

Examples of content in the first category, that a user would be unlikely to search for yet which would be important information for the user would be such things as a contact form, maps, photo galleries, catering menu, testimonials, and the like. It is highly unlikely that someone is going to search for “laser tag testimonials”.

Examples of content in the second category, that would be both highly likely to be searched for as well as information useful to the user would be the specific events, like birthdays, bar mitzvahs, and such. People search for things like “laser tag birthdays” or even the more general “Austin birthday parties”.

By defining the schism between the two types of content, we can then begin to organize our SEO strategy and incorporate it into the site build. We decided to use the parallax effect on the home page and on all general information-type pages, such as contact, gallery, menu, testimonials, map, etcetera. We included in the parallax page a section called “Events”.

When the user eventually scrolled his or her way through to the Events page, we presented the user with a list of events typically hosted by the facility. Examples would be those given above, such as birthday parties, team parties, church parties, bar mitzvahs, quinceaneras, and such. Each item on the list was a hard link to an individual URL which contained content specific to that event (keyphrase), including optimized on page elements such as title tags, and customized content appropriate to that event.

The net result is that the user starts off on the parallax site, clicks through to a particular event, and lands on a static, or “hard” page, for that event. When clicking back from the event, onto any of the navigation buttons (Home, Contact, etc.), the user is returned to the parallax page and the scrolling effect can begin anew.

The creation of the “hard” event pages allows for individualized SEO for all necessary on page elements, customized content, and deep linking to the site.

Problem solved!

By: Matt Foster

Matt Foster is the CEO of ArteWorks SEO Austin, an Internet marketing and search engine optimization firm located in beautiful Central Texas. For more information, please visit www.arteworks.biz.

What You Shouldn’t Change in 2013

SEO 2013

A new year is something to celebrate! It’s a time to start fresh, make resolutions, and strategize for another successful (or more successful) year of business. SEO had quite a few changes in 2012 and the new year allows us to question and/or predict what changes might occur over the course of 2013. The many updates by Google had the industry on its toes fixing problems, reevaluting strategies, and trying to new ways to enhance or improve our campaigns for clients. While a new year offers a lot of opportunities and challenges, there are some tried and true SEO strategies that you shouldn’t change in 2013.

First and foremost, you should always have a solid foundation from which to build your search engine optimization campaign. The foundation begins with a fully optimized site. SEO your site, but do not over optimize. A site is for the user and should be built to be user-friendly. However, there are onpage elements that should be properly optimized. One change that you might want to consider for 2013 is ensuring that your site is mobile friendly. Last year we all saw the effects of mobile search and how it has increased with the addition of smart phones.

Content will always be king in the world of search engine optimization. This I feel will never change. High quality content both on the site itself and through blogging is useful and a very integral part of a campaign. Social media content, status updates and such, should also remain at the top of your list for continued practices in 2013. Content should continue to remain fresh and posted regularly. Fresh content could consist of social media updates, videos, and/or blog articles. Promote content in a natural way and build links without black hat practices.

Staying up to date with social media platforms is another practice you shouldn’t change in 2013. Social has been a proven technique for increasing traffic, brand awareness, mentions, links, and the like. Popular social media platforms in 2012 included Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google +, and Pinterest. Post regularly and stay engaged with your target audience.

About the Author: Krystle Green is the Vice President of ArteWorks SEO, a full service search engine optimization Austin firm located in Texas. For more information about SEO, SEM, or social media please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.

That Photo Was Private

Zuckerburg made headlines today, but it wasn’t Mark we are reading about. His sister Randi caused a viral storm without realizing it after posting a family photo on her Facebook account. This poses an interesting question about the privacy policies in regards to Facebook photo posting. Are Facebook’s privacy settings confusing? Facebook undergoes a lot of changes and the privacy settings are no stranger to the updates. There are privacy loopholes that users, including Randi Zuckerburg, have fallen victim too.

Randi posted a family photo from Christmas of the Zuckerburg’s to her Facebook account. She was under the impression that the family photo was only viewable by her friends. She had tagged people in the photo which then, by default, made the picture appear in those peoples’ timelines. A lot of Facebook users’ do this with pictures they post of friends. Once you tag someone and the picture is posted on their timeline, the image is no longer private especially if the user doesn’t use privacy settings. This is what happened in Randi’s case. A friend of the person she tagged was able to view the photo, and she posted it to her Twitter account (of which she has 40,000 followers).

Randi tweeted at the user and was furious that her private photo went public. A few tweets were exchanged and deleted…however we all know once a tweet is seen it isn’t always deleted permanently especially when people use third party applications such as Tweetdeck. The story of the private family photo and the image itself went viral.

If a Facebook employee doesn’t even understand the privacy settings, how is the average user viewing these settings as well? Are the privacy settings too confusing? I wonder if there will be another Facebook update after this photo fiasco.

This controversy isn’t just happening on Facebook. Instagram is also under pressure from its users about picture privacy guidelines. If you post pictures to a social network, who really owns the rights to the pictures? Privacy policy should be clear for all users to comprehend. As a user of different social networks, it is important to take your own precautions. Especially in regards to private messages, status updates, and pictures. Once something is posted online, it is there forever. Not only should private users take precautions, but this is an important lesson for corporations to follow as well.

About the Author: Krystle Green is the Vice President of ArteWorks SEO, a full service search engine optimization company located in Austin, TX. For more information about social media, SEM, or SEO Austin please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.

Promoting your Small Business with Google

Search Engine Optimization has become one of the best ways to get your website the kind of visibility and traffic necessary to keep your business thriving. Many smaller companies, however, may have never considered an SEO campaign, mostly because they feel that local and specialized businesses work different in search engine rankings than the larger, more competitive businesses do.

While Google admits that small businesses need to take a different approach to SEO than larger businesses would, it’s beginning to focus more on how small businesses can optimize their sites. Google has never intentionally overlooked small businesses; however they are definitely trying to focus on these businesses more and tap into the billions of dollars of revenue they’ve been missing out on. “Small businesses” are those with 99 or less employees, which make up more than 95% of U.S. businesses.

A recent Wall Street Journal article helped outline how Google plans to change its interactions with these small businesses. Google has been trying to push Google+ and may be able to push small businesses towards experimenting with this social media tool, as a way to not only promote Google+, but to find almost a niche market to advertise in for these smaller businesses.

Another way Google is trying to attract small businesses is with a more unified dashboard that makes interacting with all Google products easier and more user friendly. Since the majority of small businesses are actually sized more in the one to ten employee category, it’s very realistic to assume that some business are not advertising online because they have no one skilled enough to handle the undertaking.

Here are a couple more suggestions from Google for small businesses looking to work on their search engine position:

  • Keyword Research
  • Competitive Analysis
  • Google+ Local Page Optimization
  • Google Analytics tracking and reporting
  • Fresh, Relevant Content
  • Link Building

Luckily for many smaller businesses, if any of that looks like jibberish to you, you can always hire an experienced SEO company to create an integrated campaign for you. A company experienced in SEO in Austin will be able to evaluate your current standing, how to surpass your competition and how to keep you organically ranked. Even if you don’t have a huge budget for advertising, many SEO companies are willing to work with you on creating a smaller, and more focused campaign. The reality is that your competitors will probably be in the same position (budget-wise), so even a small budget can make a big difference, especially if your competition isn’t doing any optimizing themselves.

About the Author: Allison Schnur is the Marketing Manager of ArteWorks SEO, a full service Austin SEO firm located in Austin, TX. For more information about our top rated search engine optimization company please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.

Google Drive

Google has been busy this year churning out products, applications and now even cloud computing. Google has long had their Docs application, which allowed users to edit, update and share documents to help with group projects and collaborations. Google Drive takes this cloud concept one step further. So what exactly can Google Drive do for you?

First of all, Google Drive has been created to work alongside Google’s host of other applications, to enhance your overall Google experience. You can quickly save photos from Google+ and soon you can even access Drive through Gmail, making your library available to your entire contact list, if you so choose. While Drive is still adding functionality daily, the goal is to be able to send faxes, edit videos and even create website mockups.

Drive is essentially “Cloud Computing,” which allows you to store all of your information securely and access it from anywhere. Cloud computing helps keep your information safe in the event of a computer meltdown or a stolen laptop, which means all of your pictures, documents and memories can still be accessed, through another computer.

Google Drive is basically creating a file system for your life, you can search by keyword and filter by file type, allowing you to quickly find documents, collaborate with friends and co-workers and completely organize and alphabetize your documents.

Not everyone is excited about Google Drive, however, and many companies worry about competing with one of the fastest-growing companies in the world. Not only are other Cloud Computing companies like Dropbox and iCloud feeling the competition, but even Microsoft Suite may lose some valued customers to Google’s constantly evolving applications. While Microsoft creates software, not applications, Google is close to creating a fully integrated work station that allows its users to be completely tapped into work, organization and entertainment all at once.

So what is Google achieving by offering Cloud Computing to its users? The once-modest search engine may offer a host of applications and add-ons for its users, but many people forget that Google’s main source of revenue comes from its advertisers. As an Austin SEO Company, we definitely understand online advertising is one of the most effective ways to get your company, products and services in the spotlight, and Google is paving the way on targeting potential customers to a tee.

The more applications that Google offers to its users, the more specifically it can categorize them into specific consumer pools, allowing advertisers to spend the least amount of marketing dollars to capture the exact audience of their choosing.

While some internet users may not appreciate the customized advertising, others understand that the internet thrives on marketing opportunities, and they figure if they’re going to be sold to, it might as well be something they’re interested in.

About the Author: Allison Schnur is the Marketing Manager of ArteWorks SEO, a full service Austin SEO firm located in Austin, TX. For more information about our top rated search engine optimization company please visit http://www.arteworks.biz.

Google AdWords for Video

Google didn’t become the number one search engine in the world by staying in one place. It is one of the most innovative and forward-thinking companies on the planet and in true ‘Google fashion’, they’ve introduced the newest online marketing concept this week; AdWords for Video. Google has teamed up with YouTube, who they purchased in 2006 for a cool $1.65 billion, to create yet another great opportunity for online advertisers.

The concept is simple; AdWords for Video is available to online advertisers who are looking to purchase keywords to promote their videos. The keywords will allow videos to be found during relevant video searches and the companies will pay only for the targeted video ads that people actually view. Not only can they promote their company through AdWords for Video, but they can also gain access to detailed information about how, when and where their ads were viewed, which can give them valuable insight as to where their marketing dollars are being best spent.

The concept was created over two years ago, as the rise of SmartPhones has encouraged a frenzy of advertisers running towards mobile apps and internet videos. YouTube’s Group Product Manager was talking with some of his business-owner friends and recommended that they advertise on YouTube. The thought had never crossed their minds, and they were curious to learn more. Singh headed up the project for the past two years and has found that, on average, “YouTube video ads drive a 20 percent increase in traffic to your website and a 5 percent increase in searches for your business.”

AdWords for Video had a soft launch in September, when the program was first announced to the public and has been in beta testing with a select few advertisers. Now AdWords for Video is having its official launch and Google has even appointed nine business ambassadors to go public with their success stories. The program integrates your company’s video campaign into the AdWords dashboard, which makes AdWords for Video fairly intuitive for regular AdWords users. Google is even giving away $50 million in free Google AdWords advertising to encourage businesses to give it a try. While Google AdWords can be set up and managed by your own company, hiring an experienced SEO company can help maximize your online advertising dollars. A good Austin SEO company will optimize your keywords through a fully integrated campaign, saving your company its valuable time to focus on what it does best.

ArteWorks SEO is a full service Austin SEO company who has been active in the search engine optimization business since 1995. For more information or to contact us regarding our services, please visit www.arteworks.biz.